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Ibera Wetlands

Explore a Vast Watery Paradise by the Parana

The comparison between the Ibera Wetlands and the Okavango Delta is an apt one. In both vast regions it’s hard to tell where the water ends and the land begins, and indeed the dividing line changes with the seasons. The wildlife is semi-aquatic, few roads penetrate the area, and the best way to get about is frequently by boat or kayak.

One day it is hoped that the Ibera Wetlands will become a national park, but for now responsibility for its care falls to local communities, NGOs, and a pioneering eco-tourism companies. Rincon del Socorro, the name of a nature reserve as well as an eco-lodge, is owned and managed by the Conservation Land Trust, which is taking the lead on both Ibera’s development and conservation. Cattle have been removed from the reserve, and an active programme of rewilding is ongoing. Giant anteater, tapir, and pampas deer have already returned.
 
Don’t miss the opportunity to view the wetlands from the air as well as the land. CLT has its own Cessna aircraft, so you can take flight over the lagoons and wonder at the light sparkling on the surface of the water.
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Accommodation:
Puerto Valle
Puerto Valle is in northwestern Argentina, in an area called Mesopotamia. The region is famed for its wetlands, which have been inhabited by indigenous people since the 14th century and are also home to a great variety of plants and birds.
Accommodation:
Rincon del Socorro
The development of Rincon del Socorro and Ibera - which one day may be Argentina’s largest national park - goes hand in hand. Both the lodge and the land are owned by and NGO called the Conservation Land Trust, inspired by the redoubtable conservationist Douglas Tompkins.