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Africa & Beyond

Worldwide counterparts

Our world is extraordinarily diverse. Deserts, wetlands, forests and islands in different parts of the world may have similar rainfall statistics or comparable geographic features.

Look closer though and we find that every place has its distinctive character, wildlife and human culture.
 
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Sossusvlei and the Thar Desert
Stand on the crest of a giant Sossusvlei dune and gaze across a desert landscape that is 5 million years old. These sweeping ranges of dunes creeping eastwards with infinitesimal slowness form the oldest living desert on Earth.

Iron oxide colours the dunescapes in rich hues of apricot and ochre. This otherworldly landscape, almost devoid of human life, is home to an astonishing array of desert-adapted flora and fauna which somehow thrives on mere dewdrops.

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Sossusvlei and the Thar Desert
Compared to Sossusvlei, Thar is a desert “toddler”; less than 10,000 years old. For centuries the yellow dunes of Thar have witnessed camel caravans wending their ways along the Silk Road from Turkey to China.

The thousand-year old “caravanserai” refuge of Jaisalmer whose yellow sandstone fort stands sentinel above markets and merchant houses still welcomes visitors today. Colourful festivals, extraordinary architecture and wildlife are a few of the reasons to include Thar on your journey to India.

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Iguazu and Victoria Falls
In 1541 a conquistador became the first European to gaze in wonder at Iguazu Falls. At over 2 miles wide and 82 metres high Iguazu is one of the world’s greatest waterfalls. In fact, it’s a whole complex of 275 cataracts on two levels arching in a great curve as the Parana River plunges between Brazil and Argentina.

The luxuriant rainforest is home to a screeching, squawking, prowling and creeping array of wildlife. From there we can take you north to Brazil or south to Argentina, each full of wonders.

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Iguazu and Victoria Falls
In 1855 the missionary and explorer David Livingstone became the first European to see Victoria Falls. At 108 metres Victoria Falls wins the height contest with Iguazu though at a mile, the falls are about half as wide.

Still impressive though, as the ground rumbles and hums, the cataracts roar and a spray cloud is thrust skywards. Bungees, rafts, canoes, helicopters and microlites get the adrenaline moving and the Zimbabwe and Zambian sides have luxurious lodges for safaris among the abundant wildlife.

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Okavango Delta and Pantanal
The Okavango Delta is a sublimely beautiful, wildlife rich, watery world spreading across 6,000 square miles of Botswana. The Okavango River ends its journey here, silently trickling out across the flat Kalahari in an infinity of winding channels, lagoons and islands.

The animals love it here, thriving in the abundance. You’ll love it too for the profound peace, privacy and exclusive comforts of some of Africa’s finest boutique lodges. Talk to us about the ideal combination of lodges and locations for the time of year you have in mind.

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Okavango Delta and Pantanal
The Pantanal in the very heart of South America is ten times bigger than the Okavango Delta. Bigger than England. Torrential rains cascade off the highlands from November to March inundating forests and grasslands.

As the floods silently recede from April to June, into the dry season from July to October you can encounter jaguars and macaws among hundreds of bird and mammal species. Not to mention 10 million lurking caiman.

Contact us to discover how we can weave this watery wonderland into a breath-taking trip to Brazil.
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Galapagos and Madagascar
Cruising around the Galapagos, whether by sailing catamaran or luxury yacht, one is continually aware of being somewhere unique – almost in another world. A world of young volcanic islands bursting from the ocean and inhabited by a curious array of iguana, tortoise, boobies and sea lions.

A world of innocence, where the animals and birds have no fear. Your relaxing, exclusive cruise can be punctuated by walks to volcanic peaks and dives among the turtles before you head for a week exploring Peru or Ecuador.

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Galapagos and Madagascar
What Madagascar shares with Galapagos is that sense of being set apart from the world with animals, birds, trees and insects that you only find here. In fact, 70% of the species in Madagascar only occur on this island.

Lemurs, indri, fossa – creatures that you have barely heard of until your charming guide points them out. There’s a sense of urgency to seeing Madagascar. Unlike in the heavily protected Galapagos, forest habitats are being lost so get in touch soon.
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Congo and Amazon
The Congo Basin is the world’s second largest rainforest; a place of rivers, grassland, forest and bai. A safari here is the chance to see Africa as you haven’t before, tourism is in its infancy so you can be among the early visitors.

Herds of forest buffalo and elephant roam the bais, while birds and monkeys thrive in the forest canopy. In the Ndzahi Concession, there is also the chance to observe world class primate research, tracking the western lowland gorilla.

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Congo and Amazon
The Amazon is so huge that you can experience it in Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, in fact from most countries in South America. From a trip design point of view this means that you can dip your toes into the Amazon for a few days and revel in its sheer immensity before heading off to Patagonia, Machu Picchu, the Antarctic or wherever else you have in mind.

As you walk, or putter along in a boat you’ll glimpse birds flashing, monkeys darting and pink dolphins playing.

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