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Air, water and land

The vast majority of places you’ll stay in Botswana are within private concessions, not national parks. The advantage of this is that you’re not restricted by national park rules: you can follow sightings off road on a game drive, be out and about after dark, and track animals safely through the bush on foot, accompanied by an expert ranger.

Camps tend to be in remote locations, so you will fly in for your safari by light aircraft. There’s something magical about seeing a herd of elephant from above, not to mention being able to survey the delta’s diverse topography from the air.
 
The seasonal flooding of the Okavango transforms much of Botswana’s landscape into a watery wilderness which is best explored by boat or canoe. At Seba Camp you can take a motor boat through the channels, watching the hippo and if you like, casting out your line in hopes of catching and releasing native fish. From Linyanti Ebony you might also paddle across the lagoons in a mokoro dugout canoe, which brings you fabulously close to the vibrant kingfisher and other waterfowl.