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Birding in Bhutan

Bring your binoculars for brilliant bird watching

The Kingdom of Bhutan is uniquely well preserved because the country puts the environment and conservation on a pedestal. The pristine landscapes are so well protected that flora and fauna alike flourish, and consequently, it’s a haven for birds.

Of the 670 bird species recorded in Bhutan, you can spot nearly 50 of the winter migrants such as cuckoo, swift, and bee-eater. The others are an extraordinary selection, including 16 vulnerable birds that breed here, plus a number of others in danger of extinction.

To see the black necked crane, which migrate to Bhutan from their breeding sites in Tibet, schedule your visit to coincide with the Black Necked Crane Festival in November. Monks at Gangtey Gompa celebrate the birds’ arrival with folk songs and masked dance.
 
Entice your bird passion by visiting the black-necked crane information centre in the Phobjikha Valley, staffed by enthusiastic researchers.

Bhutan’s best hornbill sightings are in the forests around Tsirang. Here you can privately trek to spot rufous-necked and great hornbill, pin-tailed green pigeon, black-backed forktail, and red-headed trogon as well.