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Chiloe Island

Witness a Fascinating Culture and Marine Wildlife

Chiloe - the largest Chilean island outside the Tierra del Fuego - is within the Gulf of Corcovado. These waters are the centre of the Alfaguara Project, a world famous research programme studying Chiloe’s blue whale population. They are by no means the only fascinating marine creatures here; on a boat trip you’ll also see pygmy blue and sei whale, Chilean and Peale’s dolphin, sea lion and marine otter.

If you don’t want to travel as far south as the Antarctic, Chiloe also has a substantial number of penguin. Both Humboldt and Magellan penguin breed in the same part of the Islotes de Puñihuil Natural Monument, which you can visit by boat and then explore on foot. Plenty of other bird species breed here also; birders may be interested to spot the red legged cormorant, kelp gull, Fuegian steamer duck, and the kelp goose.
 
The native human population of Chiloe was Christianised by Jesuit missionaries. One day you should therefore turn your attentions to the island’s history, exploring in particular the 150 wooden churches, many of which are protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.