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Follow the migration

Step into the scene of nature’s greatest spectacle

The scale of the Great Migration can be hard to fathom. A million is a very big number, and that’s just the wildebeest herds. The migration is a year round phenomenon, and you can join the animals in their journey, witnessing the births, the triumphs, and the tragedies.

In December and January, the animals gather on the short grass plains of the Serengeti. Wildebeest calves make their first few faltering steps in this world in February, quickly gaining in strength to keep up with mum. The herds move northwest from March through May, into a forested corridor and the greatest of natural challenges: the crocodile infested Grumeti River. From June until September, the migration moves north into the Maasai Mara, though some herds do remain in the Serengeti. In the final few months of the year, their journey comes full circle, moving back to the Serengeti.
 
Three of our favourite fixed camps are Mkombe’s House, Singita, and Kusini, and each gives you a front row seat at a particular time of the year. A few mobile camps in the Serengeti are perfect for spotting the migration though, as every few weeks, they move to a new location to shadow the ever-moving herds.