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Unique Encounters

Give your family the magic of endemic wildlife encounters

If you count up all the species in Ecuador - which includes the offshore Galapagos Archipelago - there are more than 300 mammals and a jaw dropping 1,660 birds. The creatures you meet, and also how you get to meet them, will be completely unique.

Plenty of Ecuador’s species are endemic. These living national treasures include everything from the tiny Grizzled Ecuadorian shrew and the wandering old field mouse, to the bunny like ahuaca viscacha and the Galapagos sea lion. Because you won’t find many of these species anywhere else, encountering them is a unique privilege. Where better to teach your kids about the splendours of the natural world?

The style of wildlife encounters in Ecuador is also something very special. At the Napo Wildlife Centre in Yasuni National Park, the staff hangs salt licks along the trails to ensure the parrot and other birds get enough minerals in their diet. When you walk this way, you’ll stand a chance of spotting endangered tapir, too.
 
In the Galapagos, the wildlife is completely unafraid of people, so you can get close and animals might even approach you. It’s magical walking amongst the penguin, or sitting by a marine iguana on a rock.