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Uros floating islands

An Ancient cultural tradition.

The Uru people are one of Peru’s indigenous communities, and they consider themselves to be the rightful owners of Lake Titicaca and the surrounding land. The land is of relatively little interest to them, however, as they inhabit floating reed islands, each one of which is large enough to accommodate up to 10 families.

The Uru built their floating islands to be mobile: they could move them in the event of an Inca attack, though these days they are anchored to the floor of the lake by rope. Each island has a lifespan of around 30 years, after which time they rot away, so the maintenance and rebuilding of the islands is an ongoing task.

The islands are just 7 km west of Puno, so easily accessible on a day trip. We’ll arrange a private tour with an Uru guide, so you’ll learn not only about the building materials and architectural style, but also see the same reeds being used for boats and other everyday items. It is possible to stay with an Uru family on Isla Khantati, which is a more immersive experience as you’ll fish, learn about Uru culture, and eat traditional meals together